Friday, July 25, 2014

Make it Better: Great Gatsby Headband DIY

Several weeks ago, a friend invited me to the Princeton Club for a Great Gatsby themed party. It was fun, and the timing was fantastic because I have been considering joining the Williams Club, which operates out of the Princeton Club. It was great to have a chance to not only see friends, but also experience a party where I could get a better sense of whether I wanted to join the club than a simple tour of the facilities would have given me.

But of course, one of the best parts was getting dressed up! I resolved to not spend a lot on a costume, but I needed something to pull my outfit together, and what more fun way is there to capture a 20's feel than a crystal headband?

All of the options I found to purchase were either very expensive or looked rather cheap, so when my friend Sarah put together a truly beautiful collection of inspiring photos on Pinterest (her other boards are beautiful too), I found just the look I needed and headed to the trimmings shop to work on a creation of my own.

The shop had hundreds and hundreds of sparkly options to choose from, but I was shocked to see that some of the ones I liked the best ran upwards of $75 for a yard. I wanted to spend no more than $20, and the shortest length they would sell me was a half of a yard, so I decided to look at the options around $40 per yard.

This price range took away some of the prettiest of the lengths of crystals, but still gave me tons of options to choose from, including many that had fabric backings to hold the beads in place. As I held up each potential choice in the mirror, I realized that the fabric backing was much more comfortable against my forehead than the ones without fabric, and that it would also work better for my DIY than a length of trim with only metal pieces holding the crystals together.






By going for a shorter length of trim I was able to choose a more expensive, and therefore more decadent, option for $20. A foot and a half of trim will not go all the way around an adult's head, so I used the elastic to make up the difference. This worked out well because I wanted to curl my hair anyway, and knew I could tuck the elastic under the hair to hide it. Plus, the elastic also made the headband snug, keeping it in place all evening.

Keep reading for the tutorial...





Supplies needed:
-1/2 yard of sparkly trim with a fabric backing
-Elastic
-Large snap fastener (mine is listed as "size 2")
-Needle and thread


Step one: Hold up the beaded trim to see how far around the head it will go, and hold up the elastic in place to figure out how much elastic is needed. The elastic should be held taut -- not stretched, but also without slack. Taking the elastic away, mark where it needs to be cut.




Step two: After cutting the elastic to the marked spot, fold one end of the elastic in on itself twice by using a needle and tread to hold the fold in place. This will not only keep the rough edges of the elastic hidden, but will also ensure that the elastic is tight enough once it's sewn into the trim.

Sew one side of the snap closure to this end of the elastic.




Step three: Fold the other end of the elastic as in step two, but instead of attaching the snap, sew this end to the end of the beaded trim, about 1/4" or 1/2" in from the edge.




Step four: At the other end of the trim, sew the second side of the snap. Be sure it's lined up so that the headband will close properly!


Step five: When it's time to put on the headband, place the elastic under a section of hair so that it's hidden.

The best part about using the elastic and snap is that the headband won't need to be pulled over the head, which means that the hair will not get messed up, and the headband can be placed exactly as desired. I was able to line up one of the diamond designs in the center of my forehead without messing with my 20's style faux bob at all.

...And then it's time to party like Gatsby!



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